City guide

A date at la Casa Rosada – things to do in Buenos Aires

La Casa Rosada is on the must see-list of most people visiting Buenos Aires. The iconic pink-painted mansion facing Plaza de Mayo is one of the best-known building in the city. However, most people tend to just drop by Plaza de Mayo, take their pictures with the giant pink house in the background, and then move on.

But did you know that you can actually also get to see la Casa Rosada from within?

Did you know that you can visit the inside of la Casa Rosada, the iconic pink-painted presidential mansion in Buenos Aires? Read more here!
Did you know that you can visit the inside of la Casa Rosada, the iconic pink-painted presidential mansion in Buenos Aires? Read more here!
Did you know that you can visit the inside of la Casa Rosada, the iconic pink-painted presidential mansion in Buenos Aires? Read more here!

You only need a little bit of planning to get an inside view of the iconic building since la Casa Rosada is only open to the public on weekends and public holidays. The visit is only available through a guided tour which visits the main parts of the house. And well, in some way have your own little date with the president of Argentina… by visiting his office.

But hey, the tour is for free! So, what are you waiting for? Book your visit here.

Tours in English is Saturday, Sunday and public holidays at 12.30 or 2.30 pm, so it should be manageable to fit in during your visit in Buenos Aires.

Did you know that you can visit the inside of la Casa Rosada, the iconic pink-painted presidential mansion in Buenos Aires? Read more here!
Did you know that you can visit the inside of la Casa Rosada, the iconic pink-painted presidential mansion in Buenos Aires? Read more here!
Did you know that you can visit the inside of la Casa Rosada, the iconic pink-painted presidential mansion in Buenos Aires? Read more here!

The majestic pink house is the seat of the National Executive Branch of Argentina and the president’s office. However, the building is properly best known for the famous pictures of Juan and Evita Peron’s performance on the balcony facing Plaza de Mayo.

And yes, during the tour you get to stand on that very same balcony overlooking the square, and with a little bit of imagination you might be able to see the crowds howling for Evita in front of you.

Did you know that you can visit the inside of la Casa Rosada, the iconic pink-painted presidential mansion in Buenos Aires? Read more here!
The tour forgets the stories

La Casa Rosada is filled with juicy stories not only of Evita but also of presidents escaping riots at Plaza de Mayo in helicopters from the roof of the mansion, and many different conspiracy theories on why the color of the house ended up being baby pink. Nevertheless, when I went on the guided tour none of these stories were included.

Even though, the house in itself is impressive, it is a pity that the tour focus more on the historical details of the construction and development of the house than on some of these juicy stories are the ones we remember afterwards because they fascinate us.

Did you know that you can visit the inside of la Casa Rosada, the iconic pink-painted presidential mansion in Buenos Aires? Read more here!
Did you know that you can visit the inside of la Casa Rosada, the iconic pink-painted presidential mansion in Buenos Aires? Read more here!
Did you know that you can visit the inside of la Casa Rosada, the iconic pink-painted presidential mansion in Buenos Aires? Read more here!

Actually, the guide hardly touches on the stories about Evita which… let’s face it, are the stories that most visitors come to hear. The fact is, of course, that Evita is still a tense topic in Argentine politics. However, a little be official history on the controversial presidential couple and other interesting facts from modern Argentine history could have cheered the tour up a bit.

Nevertheless, for an exclusive look inside la Casa Rosada, the tour is still worth it. And even more, because it will not cost your a penny... Or, a peso! 😉

Did you know that you can visit the inside of la Casa Rosada, the iconic pink-painted presidential mansion in Buenos Aires? Read more here!
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Did you know that you can visit the inside of la Casa Rosada, the iconic pink-painted presidential mansion in Buenos Aires? Read more here!

Bogotarian memories and reasons to visit Bogotá

Exactly a year ago, I was sitting Bogotá's international airport, El Dorado, and waiting to board my onwards flight. Behind me was a month of traveling around Colombia. A country which had surprised me by its beautiful landscapes and diverse cities. It is with reason that Colombia is an upcoming travel destination!

 

Colombia has something for every taste; for those who love extreme sport, for those who adore small colonial villages (including some of the most colorful ones I have ever seen), for those who want to be cultural, listen to music and look at art, and for those who search for a pulsing cosmopolitan city vibes. Bogotá has exactly these cosmopolitan vibes, and a lot more to offer!  Therefore, I have put together a list for you of reasons to visit Bogota, and for myself as a little rip up of my memories about the Colombian capital.

In doubt whether to visit Bogotá or leave it out of your Colombia itinerary? Check out these reasons to visit Colombia's capital!
The contrasts

Bogotá is filled with contrasts. The old colonial houses of historical center, La Candelaria, against the modern skyscrapers. The fancy dressed business men and women against the hippies playing music and hanging around Plaza del Chorro de Quevedo. Bogotá has it all. Part of visiting the city, is to just take it all in. All the contrasts mixed together in one place. One city.

Reasons to visit Bogotá, Colombia
Reasons to visit Bogotá, Colombia
Reasons to visit Bogota, Colombia
The mountains

One of the first thing that caught my attention when I arrived to Bogotá was the green enormous mountains surround the city. Towering up with their mysterious white mist covering the tops. Almost everywhere you go, the mountains will make the background scenery in Bogotá.

Reasons to visit Bogota (Colombia)

Maybe it is because I come from a country which is as flat as anything can possibly be but this mountain scenery fascinated me completely. I never thought of myself as a mountain type of person. I usually prefer the ocean. But Bogotá had me with its mysterious mountains against the colonial houses and skyscrapers.

Reasons to visit Bogota

Hit to Monserrate to get a closer look at the mountains and for an amazing view over the city. The view point with the church, el Santuario del Señor Caído de Monserrate, is placed 3.152 above sea level which allows for amazing photos and a real feeling on how massive the Colombian capital is with its 8 million inhabitants.

The entrance to Monserrate is located at Carrera 3 Este. From there you can choose either reach the top by a cable car, a train or by foot. Monserrate is open for entrance everyday (except holidays and Sunday) from 7 am until midnight.

Reasons to visit Bogota
Museums, street art and architecture

If you like me like interesting art and fascinating architecture, Bogotá should be on your bucket list like... Right now! The city center is filled with all kind of museums and the streets of both La Candelaria and other neighborhoods are like small museum in themselves.

Reasons to visit Bogota (Colombia)

Bogotá is the home of some of the most amazing street art that I have ever seen. Walking around and suddenly discovering huge murals with high quality street art… I have said it before; Bogotá’s street art stole my heart of that!

Reasons to visit Bogota

However, there are also plenty of conventional museums where you can hide if the unreliable Bogotarian weather decides to give you rain while enjoying masterpieces or local history. Due to my huge fascination for the Colombian artist, Fernando Botero, my favorite museum was the Botero museum located in Calle 11, N° 4-41, Bogotá.

Nevertheless, just next to the Botero museum is the super popular Gold museum which should be worth a visit – I unfortunately didn’t do it. And around the corner from these two museums you have the city museum of Bogotá – just to mention a few!

Reasons to visit Bogota

The architecture in Bogotá is in itself worth the visit. Even though, the city doesn’t have as vibrant an architectural screen as my beloved Buenos Aires, you can still find impressive catholic constructions as the church at Monserrate or this small colonial patio in the photo below.

Reasons to visit Bogota
Gastronomy

What surprised me the most while visiting Bogotá was the quality and diversity of the food. Maybe it surprised me because I didn’t know what to expect… but food in Bogotá was G-O-O-D.

 

Reasons to visit Bogota

Apart from the more traditional food (which includes a lot of soup), then there are restaurants that uses the delicious regional foods in a new innovative way. A place that I grow to like a lot is El Gato Gris (the grey cat) located just by Plaza del Chorro de Quevedo in the sidewalk Carrera 1A in La Candelaria. They have amazing salads and juices, and a lovely decor where the restaurant is divided into lots of smaller rooms – and then, of course, a cat!

Reasons to visit Bogota

One of my first days in Bogotá, I accidently dropped into a small corner restaurant. The place wasn’t opened yet by the time I went but the staff let me sit at the bar to escape the rain while they prepared the last tables. Instead of getting a table, I ended up sitting in the bar chatting with the owner who recommended all his favorites from the menu.

It is a gorgeous; a modern decor in an old colonial house – exactly the way I love Bogotá’s contrasts. If you want to check it out yourself, head to Capital Cocina y Café on Calle 10 on the corner of Carrera 3. For more info and picture of some of their great food, check out their Facebook

La Candelaria's colorful streets

Now I have mentioned the neighborhood of La Candelaria a couple of times; the historical center with colonial houses and street art. La Candelaria is without doubt the touristic area of Bogotá, and doesn’t reflect the whole story of life in the Colombian capital.

However, what I liked about the area was that it didn’t feel that touristic after all. Many companies and ministries have their offices places in the area, and everyday life still goes on of the Colombian residents

Reasons to visit Bogota

And then, let’s face it! It is just overly charming to scroll cobblestone streets surrounded by colorful houses. When in Bogotá, it is definitely a must to just walk around La Candelaria and its colored houses.

Reasons to visit Bogota
Reasons to visit Bogota

It is often discussed in different Latin America travel groups whether Bogotá is worth a visit. Many times, I have heard strong arguments against the Colombian capital. However, my own experience of 1,5 week in the city was positive, and I think there are plenty of reasons for visiting Bogotá.

What do you think? Is Bogotá a city that you would like to visit? Or did you already visit Bogotá? What was your experience of the city? Feel free to share your thoughts in the comments below!

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In doubt whether to visit Bogotá or leave it out of your Colombia itinerary? Check out these reasons to visit Colombia's capital!
In doubt whether to visit Bogotá or leave it out of your Colombia itinerary? Check out these reasons to visit Colombia's capital!

Quick guide to exploring Havana like a local

Havana is usually compared to stepping inside a time bobble. The old 50s cars on the streets, the old colonial houses and people sitting in their doorway chatting to their neighbor. Life has another speed here. However, it can also be a little bit difficult to figure out how everyday life actually is lived here. How can you get a taste of living and exploring Havana like a local?

 

In this guide, I will take you through the everyday life and customs of the dusty streets of the Cuban capital, and give you my best tips on how to explore Havana like a local!

I spent four months in Havana walking through the streets of Centro Habana toward the university of Havana in Vedado. Even though, it was back in 2014, when I visited again last summer not a lot seemed to have changed. So, I hope my tips can still be useful for you. I don’t know if a completely white European like me can ever really become Habanero (a person from Havana) but the closest I got was this ID card! But then again, they took it from me in the airport. Not so Habanero after all. Sad, sad!

 

Well, let’s get started on the guide!

1) Don't pay a fortune for renting one of those old cars – get the real Havana in a máquina

A classic tourist trap in Havana is driving along the seaside drive Malecón in one of those renovated old 50s car. But let's face it; the Cubans don't do that! Instead they use the older less-renovated 50s cars you see around town as transportation. Taxi collectivos or simply máquinas as they are called by Cubans, run in a net all over the city. They have more or less fixed routes, and along these routes people will stop them and ask for a ride. The car quickly get fill up (or something overfilled) with people who doesn't know each other but just need a ride. A little bit like a small version bus. Click here to read more on how to use Havana’s collective taxis.

A misconception of many visiting Cuban is that these maquinas are only for Cubans. I have never been denied to enter or anything, and you get a so much more authentic feeling for Cuba. Enjoy, and have a great ride!

2) La Habana Vieja isn't everything 

The old part of Havana is cute, vibrant and all that! But! But it is just representative for Havana. The Cuban state has in recent years invested a lot of money in renovating La Habana Vieja. And yes, it is beautiful, and El Capitolio is nice. For sure, you should spend time exploring this part of the city. Havana Vieja is truly the touristic center, and the prices are as follow. But it is not all of Havana. Very far from everything actually. And it doesn't just a part of how living standards are for the common Habanero.

So, get out of the touristic comfort zone of Havana Vieja, and hit on the dusty roads to Centro Habana and relaxing Vedado (keep on reading to #2 and #3). Havana Vieja starts at Parque Central leading downwards towards the harbor side through calle Obispo (check out the interactive map below to get an overview).

3) Walk the dusty roads of Centro Habana

In Centro Habana you will experience a complete different everyday life than in Havana Vieja. The buildings there aren't new-renovated or recently painted but old, dilapidated with the painting fall off and doors hard to open.

It has this own charm. People sitting in their doorways, talking with their neighbors, shouting at acquaintances passing by or buying a cafecito (more on cafecitos later) from a café in a window of somebody's home. The streets are broken. When the máquinas pass by filled the passengers, you hear how mental crashes against mental everytime the car falls down in a hole in the street. Head to Centro Habana to get lost on the small side streets, and explore your own little hidden gem of the real way life is lived in Havana.

When you stand on Parque Central with calle Obispo behind you, in the right corner you will have the beginning of calle Neptuno, and the beginning of Centro Habana. 

Centro Habana lies alongside the seaside drive, Malecón (continue reading for more on the Malecón). So, in case you get really lost just hit toward the Malecón to orientate.

4) Enjoy the quietness of Vedado

If you continue straight ahead on calle Neptuno, you will end up at the University of Havana located in the Vedado neighborhood. Vedado is in most parts a quieter area of Havana but that doesn’t make it less worth visiting!

Scroll around the streets parallel to calle 23 heading towards the street of Paseo, and you will see some beautiful colonial houses with small gardens in front. A local market. And even a school.

Check out the massive hotel Habana Libre which used to be a Hilton hotel. After the Revolution in 1969 it was turned into the revolutionary headquarter. Nowadays it has return to be a hotel.Just behind Habana Libre there has recently been popping all kind of all restaurants and bars up with a lot more modern design than you usually see in the state-owned restaurants around the city. Check out my post about this area of Vedado here.

The university itself is worth a visit. From the top of the stairs, you have an amazing view down the street of San Lazaro towards the Malecón. The inside of the university is a beautiful little park.

Calle 23 is a traffic hotspot in Vedado, and it is a great spot for catching a máquina to almost anywhere in the city. Calle 23 also connects with the Malecón so you might be lucky to catch a máquina toward the Malecón, and get a part of that touristic drive on the Malecón in your own a la Cubano way.

5) Spent an evening sitting at the Malecón drinking rum, Cristal or Bucanero

Apart from helping you to orientate when you get lost in Centro Habana, the seaside drive of Malecón is very popular among Habaneros during the evening. Head down there around sunset to get some amazing photos, and then just settle down with a bottle of rum or some of the local beers, Cristal and Bucanero.

Little by little the fence towards the water will fill up by young Cubans holding in hands and kissing away from the glance of their families, older couples taking an evening scroll, and others trying to earn a little extra by selling all kinds of things from sweets to plastic roses. Relax and take it all in as the Cubans do. Enjoy the view over the sea and the forces of the waves. Watch the people walking by. Just be.

6) Do exchange your CUC to CUP, and go shopping at the local market or by the street vendors

Okay, I know it! The internet is full of blogposts and articles about Cuba’s two-currency system (the CUC and the CUP-thing). And don’t worry, I will not bore you with a long description of it.

It is simple: 1 USD is equal to 1 CUC which is then equal to 25 CUP (or pesos nacionales as they are more commonly known as).

However, in my opinion, it is a myth that the pesos nacionales only are for Cubans. I have never had problems getting them exchanged. The trick is that you need to ask for it. If you go to the CADECAs (Casas de Cambio) and ask directly for pesos nacionales, you will most likely get it. If you don’t, the sweet employees there will just give you the CUC (they aren’t stupid, right?).

So, get some of your money exchanged and hit the streets to enjoy the fresh fruits and vegetables sold by street vendors and at the local markets around Havana. That’s where you really get to experience the local life in Havana. Just remember not to ask for a papaya, right

7) Walk in the middle of the street with no worries... 

... just kidding! You do need to watch out for the cars…

The pavement in Havana isn't the greatest, and especially not if you go outside the tourist area. And for that reason (and people sitting in the doorways) Habaneros don't use the pavement. They simple just walk in the middle of the street. Stop for a chat, shout something at somebody they know.

So, if you want the really Cuban experience, get used to walking in the middle of the street

Apart from the cars, you need to watch out for the people taking their cake for a walk (confused? You will understand when you have been to Centro Habana…)

8) Take a bici taxi to la puerta de tu casa – but do negotiate the price!

There are a lot… I mean A LOT of bike cycle taxis (bicitaxis) in Havana. Most of them shouting at you that they will take you to la puerta de tu casa (right to your doorstep). A phrase that has almost become a synonym for bicitaxis in Havana.

The Cubans do use the bicitaxis, so they are not just for the use of tourist. The drivers are, though, very desperate to catch a tired tourist. Since they know that they can charge a lot more with a tourist than with the Cubans. So, therefore you dump in, please negotiate your price! I was not so fond of the bicitaxis as I get too tired of the aggressive male drivers trying the flirt with me, and having to negotiate the price every time. I'm more on the máquinas.

9) If you are a woman, get prepared and use to Cuban men's catcalling (pilear in Cuban Spanish)

This leads us perfectly to the next point: if you are woman (sometimes also for men), you will have to get used to the catcalling in the streets of Havana!

It is heavy! And if you are not used to it from your home country, it can be very annoying. The more foreign-looking you are (or the more yuma you are as the Cubans will say), the more striking and noticeable you will be in the streets of Havana. And, the more attention and catcalling you will get. My simple rule is that you don't need to talk with everybody talking to you in the street (accounts for all Latin American countries!). Just simply just keep on walking, don't look at them, don't do anything. And they will leave you alone.

I had a professor at the university , who told us that some Cuban women (especially younger ones) would dress extra up before going out on the street. Just so that they were sure to receive some catcalling from the men. For me this was in some way shocking and fascinating. I just wanted to shout that them all to tell them to leave me alone and don't see me as an object… Should I actually be flatted? I don't think I will ever be. But it is part of Cuban culture, and that's want you are coming to experience, right?

10) Start your morning with a cafecito

Cubans love to share a cafecito. And there is no better way to wake up in the morning than with one of those small cups of very strong coffee with a lot of sugar. At least not if you want it the Cuban way. Most of the small cafées in the window of somebody's home sell those small cups of coffees for around 1 CUP. Just stop by, ask for a café or cafecito, you will get it and drink it quickly and continue your walk with an extra energy boost.

Cafecito is the diminutive of café. Cubans seems to adore making things in diminutive. And well, then it is a small cup of coffee, so it is just spot on.

11) Spend a day relaxing at Playa del Este

The noise and chaos of Havana can get too much even for the Cubans, so in the weekends during the summer many escape for Playa del Este (the East Beach) to relax, swim and drink rum with friends and family.

There is a tourist bus leaving from Parque Central which will take you out to the main beaches east of Havana. It is easy and convenient, and a great day trip from the city. It is possible to take a shared taxi out there but the taxi drivers are beginning to understand that it is good business to charge the tourists a lot more than the Cubans, so the price benefit for doing this compared to the bus is closing.

12) Go only to Callejon de Hamel if you are trying to sell something to the tourists

Ooh, ups! We are the tourists… Anyway, go there and try to sell something to the other tourist? No? Okay, just kidding!

Callejon de Hamel is a one big tourist trap not located in Havana Vieja. I hardly heard of Cubans going to hang out. It might just be me… During the weekend, there is usually some kind of music performance which can be fun to watch. But still… It feels very touristic.

13) You have to eat arroz y frijoles for dinner at least once – and properly together with carne de cerdo and plátano frito

You can’t come to Cuba without trying arroz y frijoles (rice and beans) at least once! It is as simple as that! Rice and beans is an essential part of the Cuban cuisine. Even though it might seem a bit boring, if you find the right place where you can get a good homemade portion, it can be quite tasty (if you are staying in a casa particular, try to ask there).

There are two versions of how to get it: separated rice and then the beans in a kind of sauce or mixed all together. Both can be nice, and then it is very Cuban! You want to experience Havana like a local, right?

Since beef is exclusively for tourists and export (read more about things nobody tells you about Cuba) for the Cubans the rice and beans usually come with either pork or chicken. And, if you are lucky there will also be fried bananas (plátano frito) on the side! Hmm. Then, you have the complete menu for a Cuban dinner!

14) For a fancy night out be cultural, and check out Fábrica de Arte Cubano (FAC)

Fábrica de Arte Cubano is museum-club-cultural center located in the far end of Vedado (check out the interactive map for its location). It opened about 3 years ago, and has grown ever since.

It is quite different from other cultural activities in Havana as it provides a more modern approach to Cuban culture. It offers all kind of cultural activities; concerts, exhibitions, interviews, fashion shows etc. Check out their Facebook or website beforehand to find out what is on the agenda.

Fábrica is a complete must if you want to experience some contemporary Cuban art.

And then they just got nominated for Caribbean's Leading Entertainment Venue 2017 by World Travel Award! How cool it that? Give them a vote here!

15) For the quieter night, finish the day off in a real Cuban style with a bit of baseball or telenovela in la televisión

Even though Cubans are famous for being big time music and party people, many Cubans families end of the day in front of the television with the latest baseball match or the new episode of the recent telenovela (soap opera).

Baseball (or pelota as the Cubans call it) is crazy-insanely popular in Cuba. Everybody has an opionion about the matches, their favorite team etc., etc. Maybe it is because I'm not from the US that I don't understand the passion for baseball. Or maybe it is because I'm not a sport fanatic at all that I don't get it… Anyhow, it is pure Cuban culture!

By the way: the team from Havana is called Industriales. All the rest teams more or less have the name according to their city of origin.

Around 9 pm, the streets of most residential areas are mostly empty. It is time of the its night's episode of the recent telenovela. Nobody wants to miss it! So, head to the living room of your casa particular, and ask your host family if you can join them for a real Cuban night-in.

In the end my quick guide became pretty comprehensive...

Anyway, what do you think about it? Did you get a good introduction to how to experience Havana like a local? Or have you maybe been to Havana and think I miss something? Feel free to share your thoughts and tips below!
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Quick guide to las máquinas de La Habana

How to use the collective taxis in Havana?

Cuba’s properly most well-known and popular asset are the old 50s cars. A classic tourist activity in Havana is to rent one of those iconic cars and go for a drive on the seaside drive, Malecón.

However, the cars are not only for tourists. The old 50s cars are used all around the island as taxi collectivos or máquinas as the Cubans call them. Their function can best be compared with a small version bus. In Havana, they run in a comprehensive net of routes all over the city. And you can easily jump on for a ride!

The old 50s cars in Cuba are not just for tourists. The Cubans use them as collective taxis – or máquinas as they are called – and you can jump on for a ride!
Getting on a máquina

It works the way you place yourself on the side of the street in the direction you want to go, when you see one of the older cars with a little taxi-sign in the window, you pull out your hand to signal that you would like to go with them.

Don't be offered if the car doesn't stop, it usually means that it is full. Sometimes the driver pulls out his hand on show you a half-open upright-facing hand (a bit like a cup). This means the car is already full. But mostly they will just drive pass you.

If the car stops, quickly approach the driver by addressing him by the window or opening the door and ask:

¿Para donde vas? or ¿Vas a/por…(place the name of the street your what to go to)?

If your Spanish is a rusty, go for the ¿Vas por…? as this only requires you to understand a or no. If you receive a quickly drop in, and you will be on your way.

The old 50s cars in Cuba are not just for tourists. The Cubans use them as collective taxis – or máquinas as they are called – and you can jump on for a ride!
The old 50s cars in Cuba are not just for tourists. The Cubans use them as collective taxis – or máquinas as they are called – and you can jump on for a ride!
Getting off

You will need to tell the driver yourself when you want to get off. So, you are still not so used to the streets of Havana, I recommend that you use the offline version of your map on the phone or start out using the máquinas to a place you can recognize. For example, from Vedado to Parque Central.

When you approach the place you want to get off, kindly tell the driver so. If you are in the back of the car, you will properly need to shout for the driver to hear you. Approach him with:

Déjame allá en la esquina, por favor or ¿Puedes dejarme en la próxima esquina?

Before he stops, ask him the price. The price will always be in CUP/pesos nacionales. All the máquinas charge the same price, so it is only need to ask the first time you use it. When I visited the price per person was 25 CUP (=1 CUC) within the main areas of Havana, and a little more if you are going further. But double check by asking.

The old 50s cars in Cuba are not just for tourists. The Cubans use them as collective taxis – or máquinas as they are called – and you can jump on for a ride!

Using the máquinas, of course, requires a minimum knowledge about the streets of Havana. However, the máquinas usually drive on the bigger roads in the city.

My advice is start out catching one in the beginning of calle Neptuno by Parque Central towards the university or calle 23. Or the other way, going from the university down San Lazaro towards Parque Central.

Since both the Parque Central and the university are good landmarks easy to recognize from the backseat of a car. The dialog would be something like this: 

From calle Neptuno¿Vas para la universidad o calle 23?

From the university/San Lazaro¿Vas para Parque Central?

The old 50s cars in Cuba are not just for tourists. The Cubans use them as collective taxis – or máquinas as they are called – and you can jump on for a ride!

 

A misconception of many visiting Cuban is that these máquinas are only for Cubans. I have never been denied to enter or anything, and you get a great authentic feeling for Cuba.

Enjoy, and have a great ride!

The old 50s cars in Cuba are not just for tourists. The Cubans use them as collective taxis – or máquinas as they are called – and you can jump on for a ride!